Teach at the Hive

We’re always looking for folks to share their skills, knowledge, and mindsets at the Hive.  There are a number of ways to do this:

Mini-workshops

Mini-workshops are a way for participants to learn more about a new or emerging interest with the smallest commitment possible.  The intentionally brief, one-hour format means that the goal is exposure, not expertise.  Think of them as giving a small taste of a particular topic.

For instructors, Mini-workshops provide a low-stakes way to share knowledge with a broad 5C audience, try out experimental material, or even teach for the first time.

If you think you’ve got a topic that may be a good fit for a mini-workshop, sign up here.

Examples of Mini-workshops

  • Intro to Improv
  • Introduction to Empathetic Listening
  • Basics of Visual Communication –
  • How to Make a Shoe
  • Introduction to Design for 3D Printing – (Instructor, William Lamb, Pomona ’18)
  • How to Plan and Make a Halloween costume
  • Interpersonal Communication – (Instructor,Associate Professor of Psychology, Harvey Mudd College)

Workshops

If Mini-workshops are like an amuse-bouche, Workshops are akin to a substantial snack: they give you a little more to satisfy your craving.  They typically last from 2-4 hours and provide additional depth for folks who want to explore more facets of a topic while not investing a huge amount of time.
For instructors, the longer format allows space for debriefing and reflection amongst participants in addition to the “making” or “doing.”

If you think you’ve got a topic that may be a good fit for a mini-workshop, sign up here.

Examples of Workshops

  • Introduction to Design Thinking

Pop-up Classes

If your intellectual hunger demands a fuller meal, get involved in a Pop-Up course!  Pop-Ups offer faculty and students a more sustained, multifaceted engagement with a topic area, but don’t require as much commitment as a full-credit semester-long course. Pop-up classes typically meet for a few sessions, 2-3 hours each, over the course of a few weeks.

For faculty instructors, Pop-Ups offer a space to try out, and receive feedback on, new teaching methods and materials without the pressure of formal teaching evals.

If you think you’ve got a topic that may be a good fit for a mini-workshop, sign up here.

Examples of Pop-up Classes

  • Reimagine the Digital Toolshed, (a partnership with the Library)